Detail from Blackmark

Meanwhile, in continental Europe, the culture of collecting serials of popular strips including The Adventures of Tintin or Asterix led to long-shape narratives posted first of all as serials.[8]

By 1969, the writer John Updike, who had entertained thoughts of turning into a cartoonist in his youngsters, addressed the Bristol Literary Society, on “the dying of the novel”. Updike presented examples of new areas of exploration for novelists, declaring “I see no intrinsic motive why a doubly talented artist won’t get up and create a comic strip novel masterpiece”.[23]

Modern era[edit]

(1971) via scripter Archie Goodwin and artist-plotter Gil Kane.
Gil Kane and Archie Goodwin’s Blackmark (1971), a science fiction/sword-and-sorcery paperback posted with the aid of Bantam Books, did no longer use the time period in the beginning; the back-cover blurb of the thirtieth-anniversary version (ISBN 978-1-56097-456-7) calls it, retroactively, “the first actual American photograph novel”. The Academy of Comic Book Arts provided Kane with a unique 1971 Shazam Award for what it referred to as “his paperback comics novel”. Whatever the nomenclature, Blackmark is a 119-page tale of comic-book artwork, with captions and phrase balloons, posted in a conventional book format. It is likewise the primary with an original heroic-journey person conceived expressly for this shape.[citation needed]

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